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Free Zones of Regulation Printables

What’s inside this article: A bundle of free zones of regulation printables that you can download and use as a supplement to the Zones of Regulation curriculum.

I’ve put together a 22-page bundle of free Zones of Regulation printables that you’re free to use as a supplement to your Zones of Regulation curriculum.

If you’re a parent whose unfamiliar with The Zones, read this overview for parents.

You can find additional Zones of Regulation activities here.


The key to successfully teaching the Zones of Regulation is to spend lots of time solidifying the Zones concepts through repetition and play-based learning activities.

There are a few main components to the Zones that your child should learn sequentially to be successful. These free zones of regulation printables will help your child practice these skills.

Zones of Regulation Learning Objectives:

  1. What the four zones are and which emotions belong to each zone.
  2. How to identify which zone you are in
  3. What triggers are cause you to move out of the green zone.
  4. How to recognize what zone others are in
  5. Strategies to move back to the green zone from yellow, blue, or red
  6. Expected behavior vs unexpected behavior
  7. Size of the problem
  8. How your actions affect what zone other people are in (comfortable and uncomfortable thoughts)

Free Zones of Regulation Printables

Here are some samples of what’s included in the free printable Zones download. Note: you can download the file at the bottom of this post.

The Four Zones:

Shows the four different zones and which emotions fall into which zone.

What The Zones Look Like

This page has some simple statements that describe what people look like when they’re in each of the four zones. The bottom has a list of coping strategies for different zones and children can color them in.

Zones Emotion Wheel

This emotion wheel is based on Plutchik’s Emotion Wheel and modified to use as a learning tool when teaching the zones of regulation. You can find some activities that incorporate this emotion wheel here.

Name One Thing…

For this activity, children fill in the blanks to name one thing that makes them feel various emotions. Once completed, ask them what zone each emotion is in, and what strategies could they use?

What Zone Are They In?

Cut out the different cartoon characters faces and have your kids sort them based on what zone it looks like they’re in. You can do this together and talk about what emotions you think they’re feel.

What Zone Would You Be In If…?

This activity has several situation cards, cut them out and read the scenarios out loud and have your kids decide which Zone they’d be in if they were in that situation. You can take this a step farther and ask them if they think their zone would be expected or unexpected (if you’ve covered that part of the curriculum) .

Size of The Problem Printable

This free Zones of Regulation printable helps children to understand and identify the size of the problem. It provides some examples for each sized problem, and the colored circles on the side indicate which zone(s) someone would be in when they have each size problem.

free zones of regulation printables - size of the problem

Size of The Problem Matching Activity

Cut out the different scenario cards and sort them on the second page based on how big each problem is.

free zones of regulation printables - size of the problem

Draw a Face Activities

One version of this activity instructs children to draw a face for each of the four zones, the other version asked them to draw specific emotions for each zone – happy, angry, silly, and tired.

Download the Free Zones of Regulation Printables

You can download these printable activities for free using the button below. Note: Some of these activities are available individually on the downloads page, some are exclusive to this free printable bundle.

Free Zones of Regulation Printables

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